Social Security Disability
Veteran's Benefits
Insurance Based Disability
(Non Social Security, ERISA)
What is the doctor's role?
Your doctor will play an important role in your workers' compensation claim. When filing the initial claim, your doctor's report will be the legal basis for justifying your eligibility for workers' compensation benefits. If you do not have a medical examination to establish the nature and extent of your injury, your claim will be denied.

Be sure that your doctor prepares an official report using the forms required by your state's workers' compensation review board. The insurance carrier of your employer will require the specific form for your state to accompany your workers' compensation claim. If the doctor does not report that you are unable to work, the insurer will not be required to begin making your disability payments. Most doctors have the correct form, however, you may ask the insurer for the specific forms they require so that you can give them to your doctor. Most workers' compensation boards have websites where you can download the forms.

If your doctor and the insurance company's doctor disagree on the nature and extent of your injury, the workers' compensation review board may choose a third physician to conduct another examination. It is important that your doctor provides a fair and honest evaluation of your condition. If your claim is disputed and requires a hearing, the strength of your doctor's report will be tested in court. Therefore, it is important that you do not attempt to influence your doctor's decision. All workers' compensation review boards take fraud very seriously. If they have a sense that your medical condition is being exaggerated, they will deny your claim.

Your doctor's objective and unbiased examination of your condition is essential to the success of your claim. Click here for an evaluation of your claim by a legal professional.


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